art-conservation:

Putting the Spring-Back: The Conservation of a 19th-century Textile Sample Book

(via mudwerks)

abortionista asked: hey there! i really like your blog. just a quick thought- that illustration you recently reblogged of a girl tied up and exposed could be really triggering to some people. if you wouldn't mind tagging it with a rape trigger warning, it might save somebody a lot of discomfort. cheers!

mudwerks:

ok - this is going to be a long answer.

In the past, when I have gotten a message of this nature I have either ignored it - or answered in on offhand and frivolous manner. I later regretted both approaches, it is a serious issue and one that deserves a serious answer. And here it is.

There is no possible way for me to determine why you would ask for a trigger warning on that post, and not on a dozen other posts from the last 24 hours.

In other words, there is no way for me to know what posts might trigger unpleasant emotional responses in other people. You mention rape trigger warning, but what about other trigger warnings? Why would those not be just as important? Some people are triggered by flashing gifs, some by animals being mistreated (I am one of them), and any number of various stimuli that it would be impossible for me to somehow determine or guard against, and even if I could - to spend a significant amount of time trying to anticipate the emotional needs of a vast multitude of people that I do not know. 

For me to create the expectation that I am going to post a myriad of trigger warnings throughout my blog would instill a false sense of safety in those that might find various themes disturbing. It would be a disservice to make them feel they can safely roam my blog; first because I would never be able to anticipate what might be needed, and secondly even if I could - the number of trigger warnings on virtually every post would ultimately make them meaningless and therefore useless.

So for me - the only real answer is to respectfully suggest that you do not follow my blog.

I hate to limit my audience in this way - but I honestly feel that the only realistic answer is to say:

Warning: There are no trigger warnings on this blog - proceed at your own risk

At the Columbus College of Art and Design, two rogue college students are creating quite a stir… but not by any normal means. They aren’t cheating or stealing, they are causing a creative riot. The anonymous duo, who go by the name Dangerdust, sneak into a classroom each week and create a masterpiece out of nothing but chalk. The pair are both seniors in Advertising & Graphic Design, and they are probably busy with a larger than life course-load, but they still remain passionate about their weekly chalk art. These two create some of the most beautiful
(and inspiring) art you’ll ever see.

Seriously. Stop it.

voidethered:

ask-omnipony:

luckydreaming:

Are fedoras really that bad?

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YES YES THEY ARE

I don’t really believe this mumbo jumbo

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I mean it’s a goddamn hat.

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Right..?

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The white rose, it symbolizes the unique beauty of all the women who wish not to be with a nice guy such as myse-

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I wonder if this works with other kinds of hat…

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Nothing ventured, nothing gained…

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WHEEEN THE MOON HITS YOUR EYE LIKE A BIG PIZZA PIE THAT’S AMORREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

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(via awlsquee)

"This was the first American discovered planet, and no-one was going to be distracted by the
thought that it was really just a distant icy dot.”

Granted the sentence was talking about Pluto but still. Not happy about that one

I want a room like this!

Must…have…

fourqs:

Sky high. http://ift.tt/1d02NAm

tastefullyoffensive:

[theodd1sout]

"In June 1969, U.S. engineers diverted the flow of the Niagara River away from the American side of the falls for several months. During the interim, they studied the riverbed and mechanically bolted and strengthened a number of faults to delay the gradual erosion of the American Falls. The team, made up of U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, blew up their temporary dam in November 1969 and six million cubic feet of water once again thundered over the falls’ sides every minute. In 1965, reporters at local newspaper Niagara Falls Gazette revealed that the America Falls would eventually cease to flow and stop altogether if the rocks were not removed. 

Four years later, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers were charged with de-watering the falls to clean the river bed and to remove any loose rock at the bottom of the falls.To achieve this the army had to build a 600ft dam across the Niagara River, which meant that 60,000 gallons of water that flowed ever second was diverted over the larger Horseshoe Falls which flow entirely on the Canadian side of the border.

The dam itself consisted of 27,800 tons of rock, and on June 12, 1969, after flowing continuously for over 12,000 years, the American Falls stopped.

Over the course of the next six months thousands of visitors flocked to the falls to witness the historic occasion.

Once the engineers had removed the collected rocks from the falls base and made geological testing to make safe the rest, the falls were re-watered on November 25 in front of 2,650 onlookers”

For over forty years these photos lay in a shoebox, forgotten until found by Russ Glasson who’s in laws had taken the shots.

Review of the Year: Art ›

Call me weird but…

I still haven’t seen a single episode of Sherlock. The purist in me is hesitant.

And the hyper obsessed fan base is disquieting….

The Nation's Favourite Past time ›

It seems that the traditional hobby of lauding the underdog then knocking them down is going strong. Jack Monroe is suffering from it right now.